Archives for the month of: May, 2013

– Helena P. Blavatsky, in An Invitation to the Secret Doctrine

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The tyranny of the majority

The tyranny of stupidity

 

What else could be worse?

In this new job, success is not hard, but it requires discipline. Just follow a few simple rules. Never be late. Do first whatever your immediate supervisor tells you to do. Do it much more quickly and thoroughly than he or she expects. When that is done, do some unexpected things that add value to the environment. Never complain. Never gossip. Never partake in office politics. Be a model employee. That’s the path toward thriving.

Read more: http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/advice-to-young-unemployed-workers?goback=%2Egde_46754_member_241851008#ixzz2UGtk03tV

15 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy

“14. Give up attachment. This is a concept that, for most of us is so hard to grasp and I have to tell you that it was for me too, (it still is) but it’s not something impossible. You get better and better at with time and practice. The moment you detach yourself from all things, (and that doesn’t mean you give up your love for them – because love and attachment have nothing to do with one another,  attachment comes from a place of fear, while love… well, real love is pure, kind, and self less, where there is love there can’t be fear, and because of that, attachment and love cannot coexist) you become so peaceful, so tolerant, so kind, and so serene. You will get to a place where you will be able to understand all things without even trying. A state beyond words.

I notice something interesting. 

My mood and energy level vary from morning to night. In the morning when I wake up, my body brims with energy, eagerness, and hope. I’m full of plans and cannot wait to execute them. That is indeed the best time in the day for me. But then, when the day dies and darkness descends, when activities cease and birds stop singing to hide into their nests, my hope seems to die along. I feel tired, and sad for no particular reason. And most of all, lonely.

Was Philip Larkin feeling the same way when he woke up in the dark of the night? 

I work all day, and get half-drunk at night. 
Waking at four to soundless dark, I stare. 
In time the curtain-edges will grow light. 
Till then I see what’s really always there: 
Unresting death, a whole day nearer now, 
Making all thought impossible but how 
And where and when I shall myself die.